Bronte and Triptych Match Genius at Morgan

Three Bronte sisters painted by their brother who took himself out of the image possibly in deference to their imaginative distinction, which far surpassed their looks

The power of imagination A striking portrait of the three Bronte sisters dominates this celebration of the seminal novel Jane Eyre and its author Charlotte, whose personal determination to be known forever as an author permeates the domestic adventures of her heroine as she breaks free from the confinement of standard expectations for women in 19th Century England to assert her individuality and independence to join Rochester in a marriage of equal spirits rather than bourgeois convenience, and the Morgan’s Christine Nelson has assembled a range of evocative curiosities from the Yorkshire rectory from which three literary geniuses sprang, including Charlotte’s laptop portable writing desk and a selection of the astonishing Lilliputian works they produced as children where the handwriting is often hand drawn imitation print font and in either form so microscopic that large round magnifying glasses are thoughtfully provided on the wall of the second floor exhibition space reached by the vertigo inducing glass walled Morgan elevator, but even with their use are still almost illegible, all of which contributes to the profound impression created here of the intensity of mental attention which being born into a secure but quiet provincial Victorian backwater was frustrated until it was turned inward towards the riches of imagination in poetry and prose uncovered in their unique family cooperative, which included a brother whose image in ghostly outline is still visible in the portrait he painted although he erased it apparently in deference to the group distinction of his three sisters, whose faces are captured without flattery and in their slightly popeyed intensity suggest that their lack of standard female charms may have helped them focus with such productivity on art, with Jane Eyre a peak reached by Charlotte six weeks after her initial effort The Professor was turned down, although Ms Nelson who has read that book vouches for it as “good but not Jane Eyre”, the latter being a work which she is now reading for the fifth time, she says, and “finding new qualities to admire in it” yet again. attendnyc-sep-8-16-charlotte-bronte

Please join us for a

PRESS PREVIEW

featuring the exhibition
Charlotte Brontë: An Independent Will

Thursday, September 8, 2016
10:00–11:30 AM

The curator will make remarks
and guide a walk-through of the gallery.
Coffee and tea served.

RSVP: media@themorgan.org

CHARLOTTE BRONTË’S LIFE AND WRITINGS SHOWCASED
IN MAJOR NEW EXHIBITION AT THE MORGAN
ORGANIZED IN COLLABORATION WITH THE BRONTË PARSONAGE MUSEUM
AND THE NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY, LONDON

Charlotte Brontë: An Independent Will
September 9, 2016 through January 2, 2017
New York, NY, August 17, 2016 — From the time Charlotte Brontë’s novel Jane Eyre was first
published in 1847, readers have been drawn to the orphan protagonist who declared herself “a free human being with an independent will.” Like her famous fictional creation, Brontë herself took bold steps throughout her life to pursue personal and professional fulfillment. Charlotte Brontë: An Independent Will, a new exhibition opening at the
Morgan Library & Museum on September 9, traces the writer’s life from imaginative teenager to reluctant governess to published poet and masterful novelist.

The exhibition celebrates the two-hundredth anniversary of Brontë’s birth in 1816, and marks an historic collaboration between the Morgan, which holds one of the world’s most important collections of Brontë manuscripts and letters, and the Brontë Parsonage Museum, in Haworth, England, which will lend a variety of key items including the author’s earliest surviving miniature manuscript, her portable writing desk and paintbox, and a blue floral dress she wore in the 1850s. The centerpiece of the exhibition is a portion of the original manuscript of Jane Eyre, on loan from the British Library and being shown in the U.S. for the first time, open to the page on which Jane asserts her “independent will.” Also shown for the first time in America will be the only two life portraits of Brontë, on loan from London’s National Portrait Gallery.

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HANS MEMLING’S TRIPTYCH OF JAN CRABBE

HANS MEMLING’S TRIPTYCH OF JAN CRABBE

HANS MEMLING’S TRIPTYCH OF JAN CRABBE REUNITED IN LANDMARK EXHIBITION AT THE MORGAN
Hans Memling: Portraiture, Piety, and a Reunited Altarpiece
September 2, 2016 through January 8, 2017
New York, NY, July 18, 2016 — Completed around 1470 in Bruges, Hans Memling’s extraordinary Triptych of Jan Crabbe was dismantled centuries ago and the parts were scattered.
The inner wings from the altarpiece are among the finest paintings owned by the Morgan Library & Museum, where they have long been on permanent view in museum founder Pierpont
Morgan’s study. Hans Memling: Portraiture, Piety, and a Reunited Altarpiece, opening on
September 2, reunites the Morgan panels with the other elements of the famous triptych: the central panel from the Musei Civici in Vicenza, Italy, and the outer wings from the
Groeningemuseum in Bruges, Belgium.

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