Web Viewable Times Conference on Future of City Energy Tomorrow

Remarkable high quality Web video streaming of Energy for Tomorrow

Building Sustainable Cities theme key note film “Trashed”

Jeremy Irons Discusses Options in World Garbage Crisis with Andrew Revkin

Jeremy Irons is depressed by his world tour of garbage and how its attempted disposal is adding to the horror, but he hopes that grass roots movements will turn the trend around before dioxins become a standard kitchen ingredient

Tonight (April 24) Jeremy Irons presents his new film on the global garbage crisis to attendees of the New York Times Energy for Tomorrow conference held at the Times building tomorrow. The public is invited to occupy any additional seats which may be available (55E59 St).

The film is presented by the actor in a measured voiceover as he tours the sites of horrors ranging from the huge beachfront dump that now decorates the seaside of a Lebanon city to the maimed and deformed children in Vietnam who still suffer from the effects of Agent Orange fifty years ago used to defoliate the jungles hiding the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong fighters in Vietnam and Cambodia.

The film, as the increasingly weary sounding Irons suggests, is a guide to the abysmal future in store for us if the mountain of plastic and toxic refuse continues to build worldwide, poisoning the whole food chain including human fetuses, as the gathering volume of autism allergies and other symptoms may indicate is already happening in the US.

Tomorrow the Times Conference at the Times building on Energy for Tomorrow: Building Sustained Cities will gather experts from cities around the US and the world to discuss new ideas in the field.

An impressive aspect of the $800 event will be that it will be streamed in high definition video accessible for free worldwide. Go to this link for the video either real time streaming or post conference reference.

Among the speakers will be Mayor Bloomberg, his Transportation CommissionerJanette Sadik-Kahn and Columbia professor Klaus Jacob.

http://www.nytenergyfortomorrow.com/#

UPDATE April 25: STreaming and playback operating perfectly today, save for one problem: the strip which allows going back and repeating is missing even on some filed videos.

[spoiler title=”THE PROGRAM (Click the + tab)” open=”0″ style=”1″]APRIL 24 EVENING
(THE EVE OF THE CONFERENCE)
7 – 9P.M.
SCREENING OF THE DOCUMENTARY “TRASHED”
The documentary feature film “Trashed” highlights solutions to the pressing environmental problems facing us all. Academy Award-winning actor Jeremy Irons has teamed up with British filmmaker Candida Brady to record the devastating effect that pollution has had on some of the world’s most beautiful destinations. The screening will be followed by a conversation with Irons.
Confirmed speakers:
Jeremy Irons, actor and executive producer, “Trashed”
in conversation with David Carr, media and culture columnist, The New York Times

Throughout the day, we will be conducting networking and discussion sessions (via smartphones and BlackBerries) to gather, as well as to submit questions to the panel
7 A.M.
REGISTRATION AND BREAKFAST
7:45 – 8:45 A.M.
BREAKFAST DISCUSSION
SMART VEHICLES ARE HERE: CAN GOVERNMENT KEEP PACE?
The pressures are building for safer and smarter vehicles on our roads, raising questions about the national, state and local policies that will emerge. Several states are already early adopters of legislation to enable the use of autonomous vehicles. But every law is different, no national policies exist and innovations are unfolding rapidly. With the evolution of connected vehicles, intelligent roadways and cloud-based technologies (first maps, soon much more), there will be a host of choices for consumers and governments.
Moderated by Gordon Feller, director of Urban Innovations, Cisco Systems; founder, Meeting of the Minds

Confirmed panelists:
Anthony Levandowski, manager, Google autonomous vehicle project
Sen. Alex Padilla, California State Senator
Jim Pisz, corporate manager, North American business strategy,
Toyota Motor Sales Inc.
Dan Smith, Senior Associate Administrator for Vehicle Safety, NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration)
Bryant Walker Smith, Fellow, Stanford University Center for Automotive Research

9 – 9:30 A.M.
OPENING ADDRESS
Michael Bloomberg, mayor of the City of New York and chair of the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group

Introduced by Arthur Sulzberger Jr., publisher, The New York Times

9:30 – 10:15 A.M.
THE MAYORS’ PANEL: HOW DO WE REINVENT OUR CITIES FOR THE THIRD INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION?
The city of 2025 could be crisis-ridden if the world doesn’t create more sustainable models of urban development. Research says that our cities will continue to expand and increase in population, while their populations will bring rising consumption and emissions. Alongside these huge challenges, there are also opportunities for businesses: electric vehicles, new low-carbon means of cooling, and energy efficient buildings. We ask a group of mayors to outline an urban planning strategy for 2025.
Moderated by Bill Keller, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:
Jaime Lerner, former mayor of Curitiba, Brazil
Stephanie Miner, mayor of Syracuse
Enrique Peñalosa, former mayor of Bogotá, Colombia
Greg Stanton, mayor of Phoenix

10:15 – 10:40 A.M.
COFFEE BREAK
10:40 – 11 A.M.
COLUMNIST CONVERSATION
Jeremy Irons, actor and executive producer, “Trashed”
in conversation with Andrew Revkin, Op-Ed columnist and author, Dot Earth blog, The New York Times
*Please note, there is a screening of “Trashed” on the eve of the conference. Seats are limited and the screening will be open to the public. Confirmed conference participants will get priority.
11 – 11:30 A.M.
PLENARY: THINK NATIONAL, BUT POWER LOCAL
A sustainable city will use a high proportion of renewable energy, but there is a Catch-22: sites that generate renewable electricity – wind farms, solar farms and tidal generators – tend to be far away from urban centers. How can we create grids that get renewable energy from the places it is made to the hundreds of millions who will use it? Meanwhile, how can we increase and incentivize localized power generation and supply? Options include district heating and cooling, and buildings producing their own power through solar powered roofs or single wind turbines, and then sharing that power through a smart grid.
Moderated by Thomas L. Friedman, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:
Sabine Froning, C.E.O., Euroheat and Power
Patricia Hoffman, assistant secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy
Kevin Burke, chairman, president and C.E.O., Consolidated Edison, Inc.

11:30 – 12 P.M.
COLUMNIST CONVERSATION
Shaun Donovan, United States secretary of housing and urban development
in conversation with Thomas L. Friedman, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

12 – 12:40 P.M.
GAMECHANGERS: THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION
Cutting-edge technology is helping cities cut down on energy and resource use and this innovation is occurring at both a micro and macro level. Can we innovate quickly enough?
Moderated by Joe Nocera, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:
Stephen Kennedy Smith, president, Em-Link LLC
Judi Greenwald, vice president for technology and innovation, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions
Adam Grosser, group head and partner, Silver Lake Kraftwerk
Neil Suslak, founder and managing partner, Braemar Energy
Steven E. Koonin, director of the Center for Urban Science and Progress (CUSP)

12:40 – 2:05 P.M.
LUNCH AND BRAINSTORMING, URBAN FOOD SUPPLY
Lunch will take place in the Hall downstairs; during lunch we will host a brainstorming discussion featuring expert panelists on the urban food supply.
Moderated by Mark Bittman, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

Discussion leaders:
Will Allen, founder and C.E.O., Growing Power
Dave Wann, president, Sustainable Futures Society
Dan Barber, chef and co-owner, Blue Hill at Stone Barns and director of program, President’s Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition

2:05 – 2:40 P.M.
DISCUSSION: GREEN BUILDINGS AND URBAN DESIGN
Sustainable cities need energy-efficient buildings and the current symbol of urban architecture – the glass and metal skyscraper – scores badly in this regard. What kinds of building should be the centerpieces of new sustainable cities? Are current green building codes leading us in the right direction? Nearly half of the world’s new megacities will be in China and India: how can their leaders ensure that the millions of new structures in these cities use energy sparingly and follow sustainable urban planning?
Moderated by Michael Kimmelman, architecture critic, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:
David Fisk, co-director of the BP Urban Energy Systems Project and Laing O’Rourke Professor in Systems Engineer and Innovation, Imperial College London
Hal Harvey, C.E.O., Energy Innovation: Policy and Technology LLC
Katrin Klingenberg, Passivehouse Institute, USA
Jonathan Rose, founder and president, Jonathan Rose Companies
Martha Schwartz, professor in practice of landscape architecture, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, and co-founder, Working Group for Sustainable Cities, Harvard University

2:40 – 3:15 P.M.
DISCUSSION: TRANSPORT AND TRAFFIC
An effective and energy-efficient transport network is the skeleton of a sustainable city, allowing residents to move from home to work with a minimum of congestion, pollution or emissions. The solutions are different for old cities and new cities, and for rich cities and poor cities. But the traditional model of urban expansion followed by new roads has created a vicious spiral where new roads beget more cars, which beget the need for more roads. New, more sustainable ideas for city transportation not only reduce emissions, but also improve quality of life.
Moderated by Joe Nocera, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:
Walter Hook, president, Institute for Transportation and Development Policy
Peder Jensen, head of programme, governance and networks, European Environment Agency
Anna Nagurney, director, Virtual Center for Supernetworks, Isenberg School of Management, University of Massachusetts
Naveen Lamba, intelligent transportation lead, IBM
Janette Sadik-Khan, NYC transportation commissioner

3:15 – 3:30 P.M.
COLUMNIST CONVERSATION
PLANET-WARMING EMISSIONS: IS DISASTER INEVITABLE?
Klaus Jacob, adjunct professor, School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University in conversation with Joe Nocera, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

3:30 – 4:15 P.M.
NETWORKING DISCUSSION:
Participants will be split into two concurrent sessions to brainstorm two issues on the sustainable agenda. Led by a member of The Times team, and with an expert panel to comment and shape the discussions, participants will brainstorm ideas together. The results of the brainstorming — including suggested actions — will be released after the event.
DISCUSSION 1: TRANSPORT
Ingvar Sejr Hansen, head of city planning, City of Copenhagen
Ari Kahn, policy adviser for electric vehicles, New York City Mayor’s Office of Long-term Planning and Sustainability
Bruce Schaller, deputy commissioner for traffic and planning, New York City Department of Transportation
Greg Stanton, mayor of Phoenix

DISCUSSION 2: GREEN SPACES
Kai-Uwe Bergmann, partner, Bjarke Ingels Group
Steve Caputo Jr., deputy director, New York City Mayor’s Office of Long-term Planning and Sustainability
Susan Donoghue, senior adviser and assistant commissioner for strategic initiatives, New York City Parks
Deborah Marton, senior vice president of programs, New York Restoration Project
4:15 – 4:35 P.M.
COFFEE BREAK
4:35 – 4:55 P.M.
COLUMNIST CONVERSATION
Carol Browner, senior counselor, Albright Stonebridge Group, and former energy czar in conversation with Bill Keller, Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times

4:55 – 5:45 P.M.
CLOSING PLENARY
DEALBOOK: INVESTING IN THE CITY OF TOMORROW
The challenge is to reinvent and retool the cities and urban life in a guise that is more sustainable – and to do it fast. Some of the best minds in the developed and developing worlds are trying to address this global issue. Architects, urban planners and engineers are drawing up plans. Business consultants are looking for new business opportunities as these sustainable cities evolve. The World Bank is trying to figure out how to finance their growth. How can we finance the creation of the city of tomorrow?
Moderated by Andrew Ross Sorkin, columnist/editor, DealBook, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:
Alicia Glen, head, Urban Investment Group, Goldman Sachs
William McDonough, chairman, McDonough Advisors

5:45 P.M.
CLOSING AND RECEPTION
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